When The Dark Knight Rose.


*Warning: Spoilers ahead. And really, if you stop reading because of this, refer to the first picture below.*
— — —

Hope.
One of those little things that keeps our sanity in place, away from the trenches they call ‘Madness’. And when that Hope is lost; when insecurity slithers its way into our conscience, Fear, Chaos and Pain stems from within.

On the 20th of July, 2012 the final chapter of a legend came to an end. For those who have no idea what I’m talking about even after reading the title, this is my reaction:

The Batman Trilogy, as mentioned by the ace director Christopher Nolan himself, had been a childhood dream. And we all know how good Nolan is with dreams!

Wayne/Batman.

It was this dream that was concluded with the release of The Dark Knight Rises. And it was a great end to the epic. As a friend of mine said, this movie was waay too epic to be called by its short (TDKR).

But why was The Dark Knight Rises 2012’s most anticipated movie? Why were there millions of people like me who waited for over 2 years for this film?
To answer that, all you have to do is see the 2nd movie, The Dark Knight. (And if you haven’t seen that, imagine the pic above flashing at you from all angles a million times.)

The Joker. One of the most awesome villains ever shown on screen.

Contrary to popular belief, Fiction is a very difficult genre to work on. Simply because, not everything sells. An idea will be appreciated by the audience, only if it connects with them at some level; if it imprints an emotion deep into their subconscious. And that’s exactly what Nolan succeeded in doing with The Dark Knight.
The movie was never about Batman. It was more about the concept of ‘The Joker’ (masterfully played by the late Heath Ledger. RIP) and how people react to a pressure situation.

Rises follows suit with the same vigor. Bane is introduced as a fearless mercenary and a fanatic, following the moral code of Ra’s Al Ghul‘s League of Shadows; a true villain. Although a bit on the longer side, the drag is hardly felt, thanks to Bale’s portrayal of Batman, a good plot and a generous eye-candy. You can’t really go wrong if you have almost the entire cast of Inception with you! Some say the very end, with the revealing of Talia, was cliché, but you have to give it to Nolan, there weren’t too many other ways to wrap up such a story. Cliché, but a cliché that was done to perfection.

But what made the movie and in extension, the entire trilogy special, was that the plot was never too far away from reality. Sure, Batman doesn’t exist. There is no Joker, no Bane, no Gotham. Yet, the ideas conveyed are far from being implausible.
Like in Rises, it IS possible for a terrorist to kidnap a scientist, control a group of fanatics and wreck havoc in a city. Fine, The Bat might not be there to save the day in the end, but you get the gist.

In Nolan’s own words, Begins dealt with Fear, Dark Knight with Chaos and Rises with Pain.
Emotions – all powerful, all easily relatable.
And that’s what anything memorable, be it a painting, a story, a song or a movie, is made of.

And on that note, I’ll end this post.

Oh btw, Why So Serious? 🙂
— — —
@sreesquared
https://www.facebook.com/DoWMblog
— — —
More related stuff:
-> Nolan’s parting words on the Batman series
->Fan review – Pretty In-depth

Unrelated Garbage:
-> The Hindu’s review on The Dark Knight Rises.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “When The Dark Knight Rose.

  1. Sorry for contradicting, but I don’t agree with Bane being “a true villain.”I mean, both Bane and Ra’s Al Ghul are kinda flawed types. While Joker was the epitome of evil, the League of Shadows aren’t. I mean, they do want to destroy Gotham completely, but then they have noble intentions. They believe that when a civilisation reaches it’s pinnacle, corruption is bound to surface, and that they are supposed to destroy it completely for the good of the world. But what’s the flaw in their ideology is that, they refuse to believe that good always overcomes the evil. They just want to madly destroy the whole thing for killing little evil. Batman represents the “good” and he thinks that it’s like burning down the whole field to kill a few weeds. Get the drift? 🙂

    Other than that ^^, great article, and that Unrelated Garbage thing is epic. 😛

    1. Yes, I’ll agree with you, perhaps not so true when you look at all that. But when you look at the common man’s perspective, saw a resident of Gotham, who doesn’ know Bane’s backstory, he is indeed, a true villain.
      I was trying to make the post as general as possible, away from the inner details.
      Thanks da 🙂

      1. Oh okok. Illa, you were so insightful about the film generally, so thought you might have missed out on that. I must learn to curb my “know-it-all” instincts and think like a common man. 😛 And yes, welcome. 🙂

  2. i felt that the film and the series addresses the myriad selves that we are all made of. while on the story level that was represented by the characters, at a metaphysical level it can be found in the conflicts that batman/wayne has to deal with, and the appearances that he has to adhere to in order to uphold the sanctity of the symbol of a superhero.

Any thoughts? Do share them!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s